Simplicity by Choice

Off-Grid Living & Self-Reliance

Homestead Projects November 2, 2014

Filed under: family,homesteading,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 7:35 am
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Some of what I am about to write may seem a bit opposite of what I have written previously, but actually isn’t.  Our homestead goals haven’t changed.  The primary focus of our goals has been to become as self-reliant as possible.  To live a simple life that is as uncluttered by worldly demands as possible.  In doing so, we have found that our family bond has been strengthened. More importantly, our faith in the Lord has grown as well.

Recently, we have been taking stock of where we are at in reaching our goals.  It has been a very enlightening time for us.  One issue that came up is that of being able to hunt during turkey and deer seasons.  We also have considered raising our own meat.  In raising our own meat, we would grass-feed the animals only.  We would raise the animals from spring through autumn, then have them butchered before winter sets in.  This would save the costs of feed during the winter season when grazing is not available.  Some of the livestock we have considered are a lamb, dairy/meat goats, chickens, turkeys, and possibly a pig.  This will all take a bit of time to put together since we need to update the fencing and animal enclosures.  The main idea is that we would not over-winter the animals.  Any that we purchase in early spring would be butchered before winter sets in.

With that goal in mind, we have to consider buying a chest freezer.  There is no way I can home can and store that amount of meat in our pantry.  We simply do not have the space for it.  Also, there are meats that are not good for home canning.  One example is pork.  If we were to butcher a pig, the pork chops, bacon, and ham roasts would need to be frozen.  Yes, some people have home canned pork, but there are cuts of meat that cannot be home canned.  Two examples are the ham roasts and pork chops.  With the rising cost of meat, raising our own seems to be the way to go.  Having the amount of land that we do, there is no reason why we can’t raise our own meat.

The question has been how to do this.  Having a small solar power system, there is no way that we can use an electric freezer.  Propane freezers are costly and difficult to find in our area.  So, we are making an alteration to our homestead.  In the coming months, we are building a shed that will be approximately 12’x12′ in size.  The shed will be insulated and have a small propane heater for winter months.  The shed will also have electricity from a power company.  We are going to have a utility pole set up with a meter and an outdoor circuit box placed on the land between our house and the dirt road.  The shed will be built near that pole so that we can have the electricity run from the pole to the shed.  We will be using the shed as a multi-purpose building.  It will contain a chest freezer, washer, dryer, and a home office area.  Having the laundry in that room will make life much easier on me.  I have found that having an autistic son makes doing laundry by hand just too time consuming.  I need to be able to focus on homeschooling and home therapy activities.  We have been using a laundromat for the laundry lately and will have to through the winter when it is far to cold outdoors to hang the laundry out on the line.  There is no place to hang up the clothes in the house, so the laundromat is the only option.  We currently average spending about $80 per month at the laundromat.  Buying secondhand machines and doing the laundry at home will cost far less than that.  This shed will be a great asset to the homestead.

For the house, we still plan to add a wind turbine and more solar panels to provide for the household energy needs.  We have been 6 years now without being on the power grid.  In that time, we have learned much.  We have found ways to work around the lack of electrical conveniences.  In having a shed on grid, we are not taking a step backward in our goals, but a leap forward.

Last night, another goal was met.  We installed a new woodstove in our home to provide heat.  Last year, we used a propane heater and it was not efficient at all.  In fact, we used about $48 per week  in propane just for the heater alone.  That was $192 per month in propane for heat!  Way too much!  Then, in the middle of winter, the cost shot up from $1.99 per pound of LP to a cost of $5.00 per pound.  It seemed that there was a bit of a shortage due to farmers using propane heaters to save crops stored in silos.  With that shortage came the higher heating costs.  The stove we purchased puts out a lot of radiant heat and needs no blower to circulate it.  This is a very welcome addition to our homestead.  We have plenty of trees that need to be thinned from our woods and are already seasoned.  We have already started to buy some firewood, but are also harvesting some of our own.

Another outdoor building we are designing is a shed a bit smaller than the multi-purpose shed mentioned above.  The one will be insulated and have a propane heater as well.  The purpose for this particular shed is to be a shower house.  It will contain everything that a typical bathroom has.  Easiest to think of it as a detached bathroom.  It will be located near the house.  We will still have the bathroom in the house, but this will be another option for us to use.  Just as with the multi-purpose shed, this one will be within the fenced area of the yard.  We will be able to use that bathroom whenever we are outdoors working or the kids are playing.  The detached bathroom will also come in really handy when we go about remodeling the bathroom in the house.

We are really excited about the changes we are making.  The focus is still on simplicity and self-reliance, but with small alterations in how we go about that.  As we begin making the changes, I will try to post pictures.  We will be doing as much of the work ourselves as possible.  Living as rural as we do, that is always an option that we have.  We can do much of the work ourselves and only have professionals come in to advise or to do the final details, such as hooking up the electrical wiring to the circuit box.  Between my husband and I, we have experience in doing most of the other work involved.

Saturday, we started the process of downing an old tree that was not thriving.  The tree also happens to be in the path of where the electric line will have to be run from the utility pole at the road and where the new pole on our property will be placed.  Just stepping on one of the branches that was large enough to hold my husband’s weight, caused the dead branch to snap and break off. Our daughter loved to climb that tree but it was no longer safe.  The wood of that tree, though freshly cut, is already dry enough to be used in the woodstove.  We have three more trees in the north side of the house that also will be cut down over the coming months.

The cutting down of these trees will solve a few problems, such as risks of branches breaking in ice storms due to the branches being weak from insect damage.  It will also clear that entire yard so that we can plant new trees and a butterfly garden.  This is the first portion of the property that a person sees when they drive up our driveway and we want it to be pretty.

Last project we will be beginning once the weather has remained cold enough for snakes to be underground is to completely clear the garden area.  It was unused this past summer and needs much work to prepare for spring.  One goal that I have is to buy cinder blocks to frame some raised beds.  Over the winter, I can put the blocks in place and start filling them about halfway with soil and mulch.  In early spring, the boxes can have more soil mix added to finish filling the beds.  Garlic, onions, and other root crops can be planted in them right away as soon as the ground is thawed.  By Easter, the green beans, sugar peas, and leafy greens can be planted as well.  This will give the garden a great head start.  About Thanksgiving, I will be buying a couple of sweet potatoes to use for growing slips.  These will also be planted in a raised bed if I have one put together for them.  I will write how to grow slips for the garden when we start ours.

It is a lot that we have going on over the next few months.  I feel so grateful to have my husband home every night and on weekends.  When he was on the truck and gone for up to 7 weeks at a time, it was hard to get the homestead in the position we wanted it to be going.  I simply couldn’t do the work on my own when I have two young children and no extra hands to help.  Now that he is home so much, Joe is able to help get a lot of the harder work dealt with and we are making faster progress as we go along.

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Ready for the Cold Season? September 6, 2014

Filed under: home remedy,homesteading — ourprairiehome @ 10:46 pm
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With summer break over, it is time to start thinking about the upcoming cold season. Not just the temperatures, but the illnesses as well. Have you started preparing? If your family is like ours, there are certain remedies that you like to have on hand during the cold weather. Simple items like soothing cough drops, teas, and even basic over the counter cold remedies.

In looking ahead, I have been taking stock of what we have in our supply shelves. In the pantry room, I have one set of shelving that is strictly for non-food items. I am reorganizing it this next week, so this is the perfect time to check the inventory. Are there any cold remedies still left from last year? If they are opened, I toss them out. If they are unopened, I check the expiration date. It is so easy to overlook this. The reason that I toss the opened bottles is due to the fact that some medications can begin to lose their potency after they have been opened. Just to be safe, I never keep an opened bottle from one cold season to use the following year. I write an inventory list of what we have so that I know what is still needed.

This year, I am doing things a little differently from previous years. We have been wanting to go the more natural route for quite some time. Over the years, I have used home remedies if the store bought over the counter types had run out. We had good results with the home remedies. With that fact in mind, we will be going the natural route more fully this season. There are certain herbal teas which we find more effective than over the counter products. One of the things that I like about home remedies is that they have been around for generation. Unfortunately, our society has become so accustomed to the pharmaceutical options that the old ways seem odd to many. Yet, these remedies are often better for you. Let me give you a simple example. It is very common to try and use a cough suppressant when you get a cold. That cough, in most cases, is actually benefiting you. It clears mucus and such from your throat and lungs. The problem is that coughing irritates the throat, which is why people grab up the cough suppressants. Instead of grabbing up the cough suppressant, why not simply treat the throat irritation? Another classic example is the sheer lack of options for cough only. Most over the counter cough meds contain ingredients to treat symptoms that you may not have, such as fever or congestion. We don’t like taking meds that have the extra ingredients. We want only what is actually needed. By using home remedies, we can take only what is needed.

Now, before I go further, let me state the obvious. We DO go to a doctor when the situation warrants it. Having home remedies is simply a way to treat the things that do not require a doctor, such as a common cold. We watch for fevers or other indicators that may suggest a necessity for a doctor, especially with the kids. We have been looking for a local homeopath or doctor who believes in the use of herbal remedies before writing a prescription whenever possible. Thankfully, we may ave found one within a half hour drive from the homestead.

As like most families, there are specific things that we keep on hand. The following list is very basic, but effective for us.

1. an herbal rub (similar to the menthol vapor rubs)
2. lemon juice & honey for a throat soothing remedy (hubby & kids favorite)
3. peppermint tea for stomach ailments
4. chamomile tea (to aid in sleeping)
5. homemade cold remedy (recipe for the Amish Cough Remedy at The Milkman’s Wife blog)
6. cayenne pepper (a pinch added to a favorite herb tea is a natural pain reliever)

There are other simple things that I am adding as the season progresses. One of the main things is that I will make sure to have on hand the ingredients to make any remedies that we may need. Essential oils, herbs for the teas, and tinctures.

In planning out the remedies, I am taking note of the most used herbs and essential oils so that I can plan to add them to my herb garden in the spring. Making my own essential oils has been on my list of tings to do for quite some time now. I keep researching and have been collecting old recipes to add to my notebook.

As you find and try home remedies, keep track in a journal how they work out for you. Buy a blank book or journal just for recording the recipes that your family finds to be the most beneficial. You never know when you will be needing that recipe again. My home remedies journal is becoming one of my most treasured books. I wish that I had my great-grandmother’s recipes. She was a very knowledgeable woman in that area. My father talked to me often about having to go out and find various plants for her. Some plants required that he dig up the roots, while others required the leaves or flowers. I still remember as a kid digging up what he called a blood root plant from the woods, cutting open the bulb on the root to wipe the cut end onto a scrape. It worked really well to prevent infection. There were so many remedies that he knew his grandma made, but unfortunately he didn’t know how she made all of them. This is why my book is so important to me. The remedies that we find effective are recipes that I can hand down to my children. If you are new to home remedies, play it safe and try ones that are well known to someone you know. Another option is to use the herbal remedies found at health food stores or online stores. Best option, if you have no experience with herbal remedies is to go through a homeopath or other doctor who prefers taking a natural treatment method over sending you to a pharmacy for prescription meds.

Whatever you choice, now is the time to start preparing your supplies for the upcoming season. You don’t want to have to make a special trip to the store when you are sick. Nor do you want to go to several stores to get a single medication because other stores ran out. For some reason, THAT is a popular scenario with children’s medications. Been there, done that way too many times over the years especially with children’s cold medicine.

 

Planting for Autumn Harvest July 9, 2014

Filed under: gardening,green living,homesteading,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 6:59 am
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July is well underway and today I started new garden seeds for autumn harvest. Here on the homestead, the northern side of the house gets the most shade. Though the days are quite warm and humid, the shaded areas feel a little cooler.

I started the seeds for green beans, peas, yellow squash, acorn squash, butternut squash, pumpkin, and sugar snow peas in the seed starting tray. Once the seedlings are grown large enough, I can plant them along the northern side of the house. The afternoon shade will protect the plants during the hot afternoon, yet they will get plenty of morning sunlight.

Some may wonder why I am planting these so late in the growing season. Our first frost doesn’t occur until late November. Even the pumpkin, which typically has a growing season of about 115 days before harvest can be grown and will be ready to harvest about October 25th. The earlier plants, such as the green beans and peas, will be ready in about 55 days to begin harvesting. That means they will be ready about September 1st. Plenty of time to get more harvest for winter.

An easy garden plant to start just about anytime are your leafy greens. The only trouble that you may have is that they will want to bolt, or go to seed, if they get too much of the hot summer sun. So, to combat that, you can plant in an area that gets shade in the afternoon or plant in window boxes that can be moved from place to place. Harvesting from the greens often is another way to help prevent the plants from going to seed.

If you happen to not have enough shaded areas for planting a second round of seeds, consider using old bedsheets to make shade cloths to protect the plants. Place long sticks to be used as poles along the edges of the plant rows. Drape and use cable ties or twine to tie the shade cloth onto the tops of the poles. Make sure that the tops of the plants do not touch the shade cloth. This simple method will provide enough shade to help tender plants to continue producing during the hottest portion of summer.

I love planting this time of year. We completely miss the wet season which always seems to wash away our garden seeds or drown the young plants. Using plenty of mulch or other weed barrier methods eliminates the worse of the weeding. If you plan well, you don’t have to worry much about the plants drying up. A good watering first thing in the morning usually does the best. Never water in the early evening as it will encourage insects to come into the garden. The insects come for the moisture as much as the plants.

As you probably noticed, most of the seeds I planted are for a variety of winter squash. These store very well in a root cellar or an unheated room through the winter. These also are being harvested right up until first frost. If the first frost comes in late November as it usually does, then we will be harvesting pumpkins for a month before that frost arrives. The green beans, sugar snow peas, and regular green peas will be nearly done producing by mid-October.

I am looking forward to seeing how these do. Tomorrow, I am going to start seeds for buttercrunch leaf lettuce, swiss chard, and spinach to plant in containers or along the porch on the north side of the house. These grow quickly, so I should do good with them. We love the fresh greens!

If you are planting for an autumn harvest, what do you have started? What have you had success with and what has been a struggle?

 

No Grocery Store Challenge Preparations July 2, 2014

Filed under: green living,homesteading,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 6:03 am
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In my previous post, I spoke of a blog article that was written about a family’s challenge to go a year without grocery shopping at a store.  It has inspired me in many ways.

Over the past week, I have been noticing how easy it is to just go to the store instead of hitting up the pantry or other options.  I realize that my pantry isn’t really set up for doing the challenge.  It is growing season right now and so the stores of vegetables and such that I had last autumn are depleted.  I still need to locate local farms that sell raw milk, eggs, and farmer’s markets for produce.

One area that I am working on currently is to restructure my recipe collection.  I am taking into consideration the items we typically might buy, but can be made easily at home.  One example is saltine crackers.  How often do you purchase a box of these at the store to use with soups or eat as a part of a snack?  Did you know that these can be made with only 5 ingredients that are commonly found in nearly any pantry?  Here is an easy recipe that is fast and easy to make.

Saltine Crackers

2 cups flour
1 tsp. salt
2/3 c. milk
2 tbsp. butter
1/2 tsp. baking soda

Combine the dry ingredients, cut in the butter, then stir in the milk.  Round into a ball and knead for few strokes.  Divide dough into several pieces and roll out very thin on a floured board.  Lay sheets on ungreased cookie sheet.  Sprinkle with salt and prick with a fork.  Cut into 1 1/2 inch squares with a sharp knife or pizza cutter.  Bake at 375 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned.

There are many things that we are so accustomed to buying that can be made easily at home.  We have simply become spoiled with the convenience of the stores.  Over the next few months, I am going to be making changes here at the homestead to take the challenge.  I am being realistic.  I know that if we were to simply start the challenge tomorrow, we would likely fail.  I do want to make the necessary changes to give us a real chance at being as successful as possible in doing the challenge.

The end goal is to rely as little as possible on the stores for our food.  We don’t want to continue being caught in the trap of having to pay rising costs to feed our family a healthy meal.  We also are wanting to support local small farms that are trying to survive in a time when Monsanto’s GMO food products are so prevalent and forcing small family farms out of business.  It is also giving us back the control to decide what we will and won’t put into our bodies.  I have said this before but it can never be said too often, “The chemicals individually that are used in food production may be determined to be safe, but there has never been sufficient testing done on what the cumulative effects of the various chemicals to our bodies.  How do they interact as the chemicals build up in our bodies over time?”   By being more aware of where our food comes from, we can make informed choices.

I  look forward to hearing about any plans that you may have to trying this challenge in some form or fashion.

 

Choices in Off-Grid Cooking April 9, 2013

Filed under: cooking,family,homesteading,off grid,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 3:46 am
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Each year, we set up what we refer to as our summer kitchen. A portion of the porch is converted into a sheltered cooking area. Having this allows us to cook without heating up the home. We spend a lot of time outdoors and this seems a natural extension of that.

This year, we have added to the usual outdoor grilling. We bought a propane griddle that is 4-burner and large enough to cook up enough food for an outdoor gathering. This works in great with our love of stir-fry in the summer when produce is fresh. I can also fry up flat breads and tortillas on the griddle to take the place of bread loaves.

One thing that I am wanting to try and do this year is get my solar oven made. Having an outdoor dog and cat, the foil lined box style of solar over would not be a good idea. I am going to have to actually build something that is critter-proof. I have seen some really neat plans for building solar food dehydrators and got to thinking. What would be so hard as to use that basic plan but make an oven out of it instead of a dehydrator. There is very little difference in the basic construction. If I could fine a way to make 1 solar unit that could do both, that would be ideal.

A rocket stove made from cinder blocks would be a nice option for the summer kitchen. We have a dirt area near the house that would be safe for that purpose. It would be an option for the times when we don’t want to use the propane burner that we have. I like the propane option, but want alternatives that will allow us to not depend on any refined fuels. Wood, we have in plenty on our homestead. Sunlight is another plentiful resource. Those are our summer mainstays.

I am looking forward to the outdoor cooking. It is always a fun time for us. With each passing year, we add another facet to the kitchen to make it even more convenient. Now if we could get rid of the wasps that like to partake in our porch’s shade….

 

Too Much Work? February 23, 2013

It seems strange to me to hear the opinions of others concerning our lifestyle. As early as in the book of Genesis in the Bible, Adam and Eve were instructed that their lives would require hard work. It was after they were taken out of the Garden of Eden. The Lord made it known to them that it would be by the sweat of their brow that their crops would grow. How often do we read in scripture about the hard work the people had to do in order to provide for their families? The stories of the women having to glean in the fields for grain to make their bread or the men who worked in the fields or fish with nets are abundant. The Apostle Paul even goes so far as to say in 1 Thessalonians 3:7-10 “For you yourselves know how you ought to follow our example. We were not idle when we were with you, nor did we eat anyone’s food without paying for it. On the contrary, we worked night and day, laboring and toiling so that we would not be a burden to any of you. We did this, not because we do not have the right to such help, but in order to make ourselves a model to you to follow. For even when we were with you, we gave you this rule: “If a man will not work, he shall not eat.’”

In today’s society, we have drawn away from that attitude more and more. While there are many who are physically unable to do hard work, there is always something that can be done. Unfortunately, it is in our human nature to be lazy and complacent. It is much easier to be taken care of than to work. We all have those moments in our lives. In some areas it is far easier to take advantage of modern technology. The danger in this is that here we are today with a generation of young adults who haven’t a clue how to live without modern conveniences. Is it any wonder that when a storm knocks the power out, many families freak out? It was a shock to find out a couple of years ago that some people actually believe it is not legal to be off-grid. People are so accustomed to having electricity and all the modern conveniences that they find it too strange to think some would choose to live without it.

Suddenly, we find ourselves where we are today, a nation with serious economic issues. People are unemployed or under-employed. Record numbers of people are receiving government aid through food stamps of other means. The problem lies in the fact that there are many receiving these “entitlements” that feel it is their right to receive them. My question is this; what will happen when the nation runs out of tax money to pay for it? It has happened in other nations? What makes people believe it cannot happen here?

I have said it many times in the past, but I say it again. My husband and I do not feel that ALL people should live as off-grid as we choose to do. It really isn’t for everyone. If readers are honest however, they will admit that there are things that they can implement in their own homes to make their lives just a bit easier. Whether it be to plant a small garden in their yard or in containers on their balcony, work towards becoming debt-free, or simply being more cautious in their spending.

We often are asked how we manage on as little as we do financially. The answer is simple. We make it work. It doesn’t matter how much or little the pay is, we find a way to make the money stretch as far as possible. Being in the truck driving industry, the pay is dependent upon how many miles my husband drives. Some weeks the pay is much better than others. We have literally had a week when the truck broke down and our paycheck was in the negative due to the deductions being more than his pay that week. Then we have a paycheck come along that is very good. We learned to stock up when pay is good in preparation for the times when pay is low. It is a life of feast or famine. We are blessed in that my husband works for a company and not an owner/operator leasing to a company for his loads. A truck payment for the semi and all the permits, etc., would be hard financially devastating if we also had to make repairs to the truck as well as pay for fuel. As a company driver, the company takes care of all of those expenses.

The easy answer to how we make our income work is this. We have to work to save money. If I want to save money on the cost of doing laundry, I have to wash it by hand. This alone saves us $20 per week when compared to doing laundry at a Laundromat in town. In winter months, we use a Laundromat but in the warmer months, the laundry is done at home on a scrub board. I actually enjoy those times. I find it very peaceful and relaxing.

If we want to cut our food costs, we have to grow our own food. If unable to grow your own, you can cut costs by being less fancy in your cooking and using less processed foods. Using the raw or basic ingredients can save you a bundle in expenses. A loaf of bread that costs $2 at the store would only cost about 68 cents to make at home. On average, not including meat, you can cut your grocery expense down to about ¼ of your monthly bill if you stop buying the store versions of your favorite packaged foods. In spite of rising food costs, I am still managing to spend under $200 per month to feed our family of 4. We eat a well-balanced vegetarian diet most of the time, with a few meat meals scattered throughout the month.

For cutting costs in utilities, I am very frugal even with our water usage. Not only is this great for our environment, but it helps keep our monthly bills down. We live in a drought area. Last year, the gardens did very poorly due to the heat and drought. So, this year, I am planning a “drought garden” instead of a traditional one. A drought garden is one in which you plant vegetables and herbs that are drought resistant. Root crops are great for this! They require less water than things like green beans or tomatoes. There are varieties of fruit that are drought and heat resistant also. Many are heirloom varieties that are open pollinated (not GMO) and survive well in our region. I am planning 2 plantings of leafy greens. The first will be in early spring and the second will take place in late summer or early autumn. This will give us a nice supply of salads during the cooler months. Instead of growing celery, I am planting leaf celery. This herb tastes like celery but is far easier to grow and the leaves can be dried for winter use.

Canning may seem pricey when a person first starts, but when you remember that the jars are reusable, canning is far less expensive than buying the tins of vegetables & fruit at the store. Often, I find old canning jars at yard sales or secondhand shops. After the initial investment into buying jars, you only have to replace the flat lids that are used to seal the jars. There is a company called “Tattler” that makes the old fashioned resealable lids. These cost more than the single use lids, but are a onetime purchase. The time spent growing (or purchasing from a farmer’s market) and home canning your harvest can save your family $1,000s of dollars over a year’s time. It all depends on the amount of food you grow and preserve.

As with any other aspect of our lifestyle, the amount of work we are willing to do has a great influence in the amount of expense we have each month. The amount of work we choose to do allows us to live comfortably without the use of financial assistance or food stamps. It can be done. The question is whether others are willing to put forth the effort needed to do it. Whether it is just a little change here and a little change there, you can make a difference in your family’s spending. It is not something beyond anyone’s ability. The question comes down to how serious people are about wanting to change their spending habits and have the ability to live on less. It is only a nice idea that they would like to consider or is it something that they truly want to work towards?

 

Burst Water Line February 4, 2013

Filed under: homesteading,off grid,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 2:22 am
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Spent a wonderful 4 days with a dear friend’s family this past week. They live about a 2 hour drive from our home. I left the water trickling from the faucets in case of very cold night temperatures. Well, evidently the water wasn’t trickling enough. One line had a crack in the shut-off valve fitting. Luckily, the water didn’t cause a tremendous amount of damage before I got home on Friday late afternoon. I got the water shut off at the meter so that we could fix the problem. I was so grateful that my darling husband was going to be home the following morning. What started out as a simple repair didn’t quite go that way, but the problem was dealt with over the weekend.

This experience brought to mind once more just how blessed we are to be living as we do. Though the water was shut off for a couple of days, we had a water supply that was more than we needed. We didn’t have to worry about not having a toilet or a method to wash up at day’s end. We were prepared. It really gives us a sense of peace to know that when life gives us these little surprises, we are able to handle them without any worry.

I learned from this experience also. From now on I will be shutting off the water at the meter if freezing temperatures are predicted or if I am going to be away from home for a few days. This will prevent any possibility of a water line breaking again. I am going to increase the size of our water storage. We had more than ample amounts for this experience, but I can see where more would be beneficial if we were without water for an extended time due to a natural disaster. Being on a rural water service, there are times when they are doing maintenance on the system and we are without water for the day. Most times, this happens without any notice. Having extra water available would help in those situations also.

It just happened that on my way home from my friend’s home, I had stopped and picked up bags of ice weighing approximately 20 lbs. each. One was put into a large orange color water cooler, similar to that used on job sites, which we use to keep ice cold water on hand during warm months. The other bag was put into another food cooler to be used in drinks. If you have ice available, it can be melted to use as water for drinking or cooking if needed.

We have been considering for a long time to rework the house’s plumbing. Seeing the jumble of pipes under our home makes any work a nightmare. Some lines are old gas lines that have not been used in many years. Certainly not since my husband bought the house 12 years ago. There are pipes that seem to go nowhere. Basically, someone reworked the plumbing without removing old pipes that were no longer needed. What a mess!

It seems as though each time we figure out what part of the house we will work on next, something occurs that changes those plans. Such is life in an old home! You can’t get frustrated, just roll with it where it takes you. Adapt and allow life to teach you whatever lessons there are to be learned along the way. Even if the lesson is in how to deal with these “learning opportunities” without developing a new vocabulary along the way. LOL