Simplicity by Choice

Off-Grid Living & Self-Reliance

Homestead Christmas December 23, 2015

We haven’t always celebrated Christmas.  In fact, it has only been in recent years that we even got a small tree.  A local shop owner saw our daughter admiring the little artificial tree. She and I  talked about how pretty it was, not knowing that the owner overheard us. As we left, he came out carrying a box.  He said that we had forgotten something.  To our delight, he placed the tree in our trunk.

The main reason for not celebrating was due to the holiday being so commercial. It was all about the gifts, not the religious story.  People routinely go into debt trying to buy the perfect gift.  It just didn’t feel right.

After having the kids, we made the decision to celebrate.  The compromise for us was that we limit the gifts.  We also teach the kids to make their gifts.  This one simple thing helps teach children to give of their time and talents to others.

The little ones are ages 9 and 7 years old this season.  With a little guidance, Little Miss chose a project to make for Daddy.  She wanted to make him something that he can take onto the truck with him.  It was a simple project to complete but very useful.  Little Man needed more help with his gift to Daddy.  Mostly due to his lack of fine motor development.  He had fun with it though.

Giving homemade gifts whenever possible has become a family tradition.  We also limit the number of gifts.  In doing this, the kids are much more appreciative of what they receive.

The Christmas tree has a few secondhand ornaments.  Gradually, we are adding handmade ornaments to it each year.  A new thing added to the tree this year also was battery powered little lights.  We found those at Hobby Lobby.

Having a simple Christmas has been a blessing. We can focus on the meaning of the holiday without all the stress and hoopla that other families face.  We can use it as a time to serve others and give of ourselves in remebrance of Christ giving of Himself for us.  It is also an opportunity to teach the kids that it isn’t all about than, but learn to enjoy the giving to others.

I love how we celebrate Christmas. It is so much more peaceful and enjoyable for our family.  I pray that others can enjoy the holiday as that celebrate with their families.

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Walkabout Water Bottle Sling March 11, 2015

Filed under: Crafting,crochet,free printable — ourprairiehome @ 9:45 pm
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Here is the pattern that I promised. This pattern came about as a matter of necessity. I purposely have made this sling a little on the deep side so that it will hold any of the standard sized water bottles. If you happen to be needing a sling for a taller bottle, just increase the number of rounds to accommodate the bottle. I also made this bag to be a little larger so that you can put the wider soda bottles in it as well.

The bag works up very quickly. I was able to make a bag from start to finish in about an hour. Once you get the bottom made, the rest of the sling is made on a spiral until you reach the top edging. I strongly suggest using a stitch marker of some type to mark the beginning of each round on the sling as you build up the height. This will help keep it more uniform in height all around.

One note that I want to stress as well is that the strap of the bag can be made a little shorter than you need. The strap will stretch with the weight of the water bottle. The 31 rows of stitching used to make the sling below fits perfectly when hung down straight on my shoulder. For my 9 year old daughter, it fits her perfectly when worn diagonally across her body from her left shoulder to her right hip. To get the measurement needed to fit you or your child, measure from your hip, diagonally up to your should and back down to the same hip. Be sure to start and end the measurement with where you want the top of the sling to be. Subtract 1.5 inches from this measurement to allow for the stretch that will occur when a full bottle of water is in the sling. This measurement should work well in planning the strap length.

The yarn that I used in the same was Red Heart worsted weight yarn in the super saver size skein. One skein should easily make at least 4 of these slings.

 

SUNP0001

Walkabout Water Bottle Sling

By Paula Jones http://simplicitybychoice.com

Materials:

worsted weight yarn
Crochet hook, size F (3.75mm)
stitch marker
yarn needle
scissors

Stitches used: (US stitches given)

ch – chain
sc – single crochet
sl st – slip stitch
dc – double crochet
tr – treble

Treble stitch: wrap yarn around hook twice, slip hook through next stitch and pull yarn through. Yarn over and pull through two loops at a time until you have only one loop remaining on hook to complete the stitch.

This sling is begun with a magic circle. If you choose to not use a magic circle, then simply begin with ch 4 and slip stitch to form a loop, sc 6 times in the loop, catching the yarn end to help secure it in place, sl st to join. Continue pattern as directed beginning with round 1.

Sling Base

Begin with a magic circle. Sc 6 times in loop, join with 1st sc to form circle. Pull thread to close the circle. Do not trim! Leave tail to weave in securely after sling bottom is made before trimming the end. This will prevent the magic circle from opening back up.

Round 1: ch 1, sc in first stitch from ch, sc twice in each remaining stitches, sl st to join (12 sc)

Round 2: ch 1, *sc in next 2 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch* repeat pattern to end, sl st to join (18 sc)

Round 3: ch 1, *sc in next 3 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch* repeat pattern to end, sl st to join (24 sc)

Sling Body:

NOTE: From here on, use a marker to show beginning of each round as the pattern works on a spiral.

Round 4: *ch 3, count 3 stitches from chain and sl st*, place stitch marker in this first chain space. Continue the pattern all around to end.

Round 5-18 Repeat round 4, moving marker up each round to show beginning of each round.

Round 19: sl st to first chain space, ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc in chain space, then stitch 3 dc in each chain space all around, sl st to join

Strap:

Row 1: ch 4 (counts as first tr), 1 tr in each of the next 3 stitches, turn
Rows 2-31: Repeat row 1, use less rows if making sling for a young child. Bag will stretch from weight of the water bottle.
To finish: sc the end of the strap to the sling, centering the strap to opposite side of bag opening. Weave in ends to secure and trim.

***If you would like a printable pdf of this pattern, you can get it here.

 

Crocheting Frenzy March 10, 2015

Filed under: Crafting — ourprairiehome @ 7:16 am
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Taking a short break from the simplicity posts to share what I have been doing lately.  It seems that I am thoroughly hit with the crochet bug.  I have always loved to crochet, but never had the time to really play with it as much as I would like to do.  In the evenings, I have been sitting near my 18-gallon sized tote filled with yarn as I crochet on one project or another.  Most recently, I have been working on making some baby blankets for gifts.  I am nearly done with the last of those, finally!  I am really a perfectionist when it comes to crocheted gifts.  I can’t believe the number of times that I will frog a project until I get it looking the way I want it to.

Over the past few days has been a great example of my frogging.  I am making 30 crocheted slings/bags for young girls to carry their water bottles in at a Jr Youth camp our church sponsors each spring and autumn.  Little Miss will be attending the Jr Camp, so I thought it would be fun to make each of the girls in the dorms a little something to use at camp and take home.  Thus, the idea of the water bottle sling came to fruition. I found what looked like a fun and easy pattern online.  After three tries, I finally gave up.  I used the hook size and gauge they suggested, but the bag was huge!  Another pattern yielded similar results.  I finally realized that they must crochet a LOT tighter than I do.  Having arthritis in my hands, I cannot crochet that tightly.  So, I finally got irritated with myself enough to just design my own pattern.  I absolutely LOVE the results!  These bags are far faster to make as well as being a very forgiving pattern.  I use a much smaller hook than the other patterns called for.  They used a size I (5.5mm) hook, while I am using a size F (3.75mm) hook.  I am nearly done with writing the pattern and will share it in a couple days, after I finish the strap on the bag and take a picture.

It has been a long time since I have written a pattern, so this has been fun for me to do.  It takes me back to my years as a craft designer, when I used to write and package patterns to sell.  Times have changed a lot since then.  After having written this one, I am thinking of writing patterns again and possibly selling them through Ravelry or Etsy.  When I wrote patterns and did work as a designer for manufacturers years ago, it allowed me to tap into my creativity in a way that I found to be very enjoyable.  I loved designing projects for others to enjoy making.  Often, I would design projects for kids as well as those for adults.  It feels good to get back in touch with that part of my life.

 

 

Organizing My Crochet Projects December 14, 2014

Filed under: Crafting,organization — ourprairiehome @ 9:40 am
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It seems as though I am always looking for a better way to get my crochet and other projects organized.  Lately, I have been on a binder system binge.  I bought one binder to keep all the household records, menu planning, and such all organized together.  I like the way that is turning out and decided to take on another area that needed to be worked on….my crochet & knitting supplies and patterns.

Years ago, when I was a scrapbook and rubber stamp art instructor, I had a great system that I used for keeping track of all my supplies.  I wanted to do something similar with the crochet and knitting that I now do.  The first step was a search online to see if anyone else had put together a journal for their supplies and projects.  I didn’t want to have to reinvent the wheel if there was a good system already out there.  I was thrilled to find a free printable journal for knitting and another for crochet at Katheryn Ivy’s website.   The two journals are separate downloads.  She also has free printable pages for tracking your supplies, upcoming projects, and shopping wish list page for making larger purchases when taking advantage of sales.  In project planning, she also offers a page for joting down notes and another for making sketches of projects that you would like to make.  The final page is one that I especially love.  She includes a printable chart of all the knitting needle and crochet hook sizes which can help you keep track of what sizes you already have.  Armed with these free printables, I am able to put together a binder that will help me stay far more organized.  I will be able to see at a glance which projects I already have purchased the supplies for.

I am thinking about having the binder set up in sections.  One for crochet and the other for knitting.  For each of these two sections, there will be subsections using the above listed forms.  This will allow me to keep the two craft methods separate.  I did a search on Pinterest for crochet stitch charts and found some great printable graphs and charts that I can print off and add to the binder as well.  Some of the charts I found include the cross-reference charts for US and UK stitches, stitch pattern diagrams, and a nice stitch sampler that shows & labels each of the basic stitched used in crochet.  This is a great resource to have for those times when you set aside a WIP only to forget which stitch you were using.  Similarly, I found some great reference charts for knitting as well on Pinterest.

While I was at it, I found reference charts for making hats, slippers, and blankets sizes.  For example, a head sizing chart for making crocheted hats in sizes newborn to adult can be found on the Tot Toppers website.  These charts will make a nice quick reference for me to have on hand when making or planning a project.

Some extra forms that I am including in the binder are: Yarn Ball band labels for those times when you lose one, Yarn Stash inventory sheets, and my own Pattern Index form to keep track of the patterns.

I am looking forward to having this binder all printed out and completed.  It may not help me to finish my projects any faster, but it will cut down on the number of times that I inadvertently make a duplicate purchase of my basic supplies.

The journal will also be a great companion binder to my patterns binder.  Currently, I have a 3-ring binder which I am storing the patterns that I have printed off from sites like Ravelry.  I have them organized into categories with the first section being my WIPs.

 

Black Friday Craziness November 28, 2014

Filed under: Crafting,family,holidays — ourprairiehome @ 9:26 pm
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I have never understood the fascination that many have of going out shopping the day after Thanksgiving.  Yes, there are great sales, but the size of crowds and traffic alone is enough to make me cringe.  I have tried it a couple of times, years ago, and hated it.  Maybe because I went out alone, or maybe because I didn’t really have a plan to make it fun.  Either way, I have found myself thinking now that I am glad that I don’t put myself through that.

What I am doing is making the gifts at home or ordering online.  I find it much more satisfying and calming to my spirit to avoid the crowds.  I am lucky to have people around me who also enjoy receiving the handmade gifts.  Rarely have I had someone be too snooty to accept something handmade.  On the rare occasions when that has happened over the years, I just make mental note to never make them anything homemade again.  If anything, they will get a little gift card so that they can buy what they want.

One thing that I have been trying to instill in our children is the importance of giving of oneself through your time and talents.  With that in mind, I am teaching them to also make their gifts.  It is fun to watch them work on a project that takes several days (or longer) to complete.  The pride that Little Miss feels when she finishes the item and gives it to the recipient of the gift is a joy to see.  Likewise, I am so grateful that the gifts are well received and the children are praised for their efforts.

There are many gift ideas that you can find on Pinterest and other online resources that will give you examples of things kids can make.  These are not just the cutesy crafts but you can find meaningful gifts that can be used for a purpose.  A project that the kids are working on is to make an ornament for each person they make a gift for.  The ornaments that they are making are so cute and easy for them to do.  Even Pookie is getting in on it.

The best part of the holiday crafting is that instead of dealing with crowds at stores, we are spending time being creative as a family.  That in and of itself is a gift that you cannot replace.

 

Christmas Ornament Exchange & More November 4, 2014

Filed under: Crafting,family,holidays,old fashioned — ourprairiehome @ 9:05 am
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On Facebook, I am hosting a Handmade Christmas Ornament Exchange.  It has been so much fun making the ornaments to mail out to the swap participants.  Mine are all crocheted.  I went onto the Ravelry website and did a search for free patterns and found a plethora of ideas.  I have always loved the look of old fashioned handmade ornaments.  Each year, I try to make a new decoration or other item to add to our collection.  Last year was the first time we had an actual Christmas tree.  It is a small tabletop style, but in our home, that works for us.

I have been busy crocheting a lot this year.  Nearly everyone will be getting something crocheted or otherwise handmade.  One new aspect is that both of the kids will be able to make gifts this year.  I wasn’t sure if our son was going to be able to do it but found some neat ideas for crafts that both kids can make.

I wanted him to make something a little more personal for his Occupational, Physical, and Speech therapists though, so designed an ornament for him to make each of them.  He is learning sign language, so that will be incorporated into his project for them.  I don’t have pictures at this time because the camera I was using doesn’t work anymore.  I will try to post a picture tutorial later though if my husband is able to take pictures for me to upload.

Here is one idea that is a very simple one to make.  I am using the air-dry modeling compound made by Crayola for this project.

“I Love You” Clay Ornament

Make a tracing of your child’s hand on a sheet of paper.  Carefully cut it out.  This will become a pattern for your ornament.  Roll out the modeling compound to 1/8″ thick.  Carefully use a knife to cut out the hand print pattern from the clay.  Fold the middle and ring fingers downward so that the clay hand print looks like the sign meaning “I love you.”  You may need to lightly dampen the folded fingers t make them stick to the palm of the hand.

Next, using a small plate or bowl, cut out a circle that is slightly larger than the clay hand, from the 1/8″ thick clay.  This will become the base you attach the hand print to.  Lightly dampen the back of the hand and place it in the center of the ornament base.  Press just firmly enough to make it stick well, but not enough to flatten the hand too much.  You want the dimension of the sign language gesture to remain clear to see.  Using a straw, make a hole for hanging the ornament at the top center.

Let the clay dry thoroughly.  You can speed up the process by placing it on a wire rack in a warm oven, if necessary.  Follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully if you attempt to dry them in the oven.

Once completely dried and hardened, you can have your children paint their hand print ornaments.  Use a permanent marker to write their name and the year on the ornament once the paint is dry.  To give a shiny finish, you can spray the ornaments with a glossy clear coat of spray paint.  After the ornament if finished, thread a ribbon through the hole and tie the ends into a knot.  Enjoy!!!

Another fun idea that Little Miss is making is a crocheted garland.  She is just learning to crochet and wanted to make a simple decoration for the tree.  So, she is crocheting a long garland using the basic chain stitch.  I will be teaching her how to add beads to her garland as she crochets.  It is really simple.

Beaded Chain Stitch Garland

This is a perfect first project for a little child to make.  There is no gauge or specific hook size.  All you need is the crochet hook, a smaller steel hook that is small enough to thread through a bead’s hole, yarn, and the beads.

The distance between beads is up to the person making the garland.  On our little tree, the beads will be about one bead every 1.5″ of stitches.

Begin making the chain.  When you reach the point where you want to add a bead, carefully remove the crochet hook.  Using the steel hook, thread a bead onto the hook.  Next, grab up the loop of yarn with the steel hook and slip the bead off of the hook, bring the yarn through the bead’s hole.  Set aside the steel hook and place the yarn loop back onto the crochet hook you are using to make the chain stitching.  Continue chain stitching until you are ready to add another bead.  Repeat this pattern until the garland is the size you want.  That’s it!  A very simple garland that a child can make successfully.

There are so many handmade decorations and gifts that kids can make for others.  By teaching them from an early age to hand-make their decorations and gifts, you are not only teaching them a craft/skill, but are teaching them to give of their time and talents.  It is something that will benefit them for many years to come.

 

Gift Idea: Spa Basket October 7, 2014

Filed under: Crafting,holidays,simplicity — ourprairiehome @ 6:56 am
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I love the responses that I get when people find out that I ma working on holiday gifts and decorations. Some think it is too soon to think about, while others think I should have started long ago. For those on the fence of this issue, let me put a perspective on it. Each year there are numerous blog posts about people going quietly nuts during the holiday season. They become stressed out and are freaking over the littlest of things. Often, they are stressed over the gift purchases. I have to wonder, “Why do they do this to themselves each year?” If you started this week and made/purchased only 1 gift item each week, you would have 12 bought by the week of Christmas. Now, let’s imagine that I decide to crochet a hat for the two kids and my 2 young grandsons. I can crochet a hat in a couple of hours. Yes, some are faster than I am but I am also homeschooling my kids. I could easily make a hat a day and have 4 gifts made in a week. Here is another easy and fun gift for the women in your life. Now, for those who don’t crochet or do crafts, you can easily buy all the items in this gift, but it would also take less than a week to make it all. Here is the spa basket gift idea with links to any necessary patterns or instructions. Use masculine scents and colors to make this for a guy.

Crocheted Basket

Lavendar Soap for the ladies

Coffee Bean Soap for the guys

Bath Salts

Crocheted Face Cloth

Face Scrubbies

Nicely Scented Candle

As I already stated, you could buy the items and put the basket together, or make them yourself. Either way, this is a nice gift that can be done within a week.

Enjoy!