Simplicity by Choice

Off-Grid Living & Self-Reliance

Spring…….Finally March 23, 2015

Filed under: family,homesteading,off grid — ourprairiehome @ 5:33 am
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I was beginning to wonder if Mother Nature was ever going to get over her PMS and allow spring to arrive.  It seems that she finally got the idea and has allowed our weather to turn into it’s typical rainy self.  Each spring, I am eager to start planting the garden but have to wait.  You see, we live in a wonderful little area that has a week of nasty weather every year sometime in the week before or after Easter.  Never fails.  Plant the garden before Easter and you end up with a garden that either freezes or gets flooded out.  So, I have learned to be more patient over the years.  I wait until after Easter has passed by before I start planting anything.

We woke up early Sunday morning, about 4:30am, so that we could fumigate the attic.  We live in a state that has a lot of problems with red wasps.  So, it is not uncommon to see people load up on the cans of wasp spray or the fumigating foggers to use in attic spaces and other areas that the wasps might try to set up their nests.  We got the kids up and had a quick breakfast before loading them up into the car.  Hubby set off the foggers in our attic and we headed to town.  We ended up taking our laundry to the laundromat and ran a few errands afterward.  The foggers don’t seep down into the rest of the house, so we don’t have to cover anything ahead of time.

By the time we get home, the foggers have done their job.  This ritual is one that we repeat every 3-4 weeks throughout the warm months to control the wasps.  Another item that we began using last year that works great is to set out around the known wasp areas outdoors the TrapStik by a company called Rescue.

Trapstik

Trapstik for Wasps

This is probably the one thing that has been the most effective.  It is a sticky green trap that you hang up.  The wasps are drawn to it and within a couple of days, we have a full trap.  If you set these out early enough, you have a good chance of trapping the queen.  A wasp queen will leave the nest area early in the season.  If you can get her, the wasp colony will collapse.   What I loved about this trap is that it is pesticide free and we also never caught a honey bee on it.  The trap works to catch all types of wasps and carpenter bees.  We hang them in areas near their nests or anywhere they you notice a lot of wasp activity.  These really are effective in reducing the wasp population.  Some stores, such as Lowes, carries these but we also buy them online.

I am looking forward to getting out outdoor laundry and kitchen set up again.  Now that Mother Nature got over her winter mood, we will soon be getting those areas ready for summer.  During the warm months, we spend a lot of our time outdoors.  The kids have their pool and play area to enjoy.  Lots of shade trees are a bonus as well.  One thing that I typically stop doing in summer is baking.  I don’t like to heat up the house by using the oven unless it is necessary.  If I do choose to bake something, it is in the late evening or very early in the morning when the cook night breezes are present.  We are looking at designs for building an outdoor bread oven but haven’t chosen one yet.  In the long term plans for the homestead, we want to have a permanent area designated and set up as our outdoor kitchen.  So far, the plan is to build the oven and an outdoor grill from brick or stone.  Having it set up in a sheltered area will make it easy to use during rainy days.  I still love the idea of having a screened kitchen.  Basically, it is a room that is built with half-height walls.  The top half of the wall areas are completely screened in so that you can use the room during wet weather as well as keeping flies and such out.  I can easily see this as being one of the most used spaces during the warm months.  The kids can homeschool at a table while enjoying the cooling breeze.  Having the kitchen in there will allow me to be able to prepare meals and do my canning without heating up the kitchen in the house.   An outdoor kitchen with the screened area will make a nice place to have BBQs and entertain as well.

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Walkabout Water Bottle Sling March 11, 2015

Filed under: Crafting,crochet,free printable — ourprairiehome @ 9:45 pm
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Here is the pattern that I promised. This pattern came about as a matter of necessity. I purposely have made this sling a little on the deep side so that it will hold any of the standard sized water bottles. If you happen to be needing a sling for a taller bottle, just increase the number of rounds to accommodate the bottle. I also made this bag to be a little larger so that you can put the wider soda bottles in it as well.

The bag works up very quickly. I was able to make a bag from start to finish in about an hour. Once you get the bottom made, the rest of the sling is made on a spiral until you reach the top edging. I strongly suggest using a stitch marker of some type to mark the beginning of each round on the sling as you build up the height. This will help keep it more uniform in height all around.

One note that I want to stress as well is that the strap of the bag can be made a little shorter than you need. The strap will stretch with the weight of the water bottle. The 31 rows of stitching used to make the sling below fits perfectly when hung down straight on my shoulder. For my 9 year old daughter, it fits her perfectly when worn diagonally across her body from her left shoulder to her right hip. To get the measurement needed to fit you or your child, measure from your hip, diagonally up to your should and back down to the same hip. Be sure to start and end the measurement with where you want the top of the sling to be. Subtract 1.5 inches from this measurement to allow for the stretch that will occur when a full bottle of water is in the sling. This measurement should work well in planning the strap length.

The yarn that I used in the same was Red Heart worsted weight yarn in the super saver size skein. One skein should easily make at least 4 of these slings.

 

SUNP0001

Walkabout Water Bottle Sling

By Paula Jones http://simplicitybychoice.com

Materials:

worsted weight yarn
Crochet hook, size F (3.75mm)
stitch marker
yarn needle
scissors

Stitches used: (US stitches given)

ch – chain
sc – single crochet
sl st – slip stitch
dc – double crochet
tr – treble

Treble stitch: wrap yarn around hook twice, slip hook through next stitch and pull yarn through. Yarn over and pull through two loops at a time until you have only one loop remaining on hook to complete the stitch.

This sling is begun with a magic circle. If you choose to not use a magic circle, then simply begin with ch 4 and slip stitch to form a loop, sc 6 times in the loop, catching the yarn end to help secure it in place, sl st to join. Continue pattern as directed beginning with round 1.

Sling Base

Begin with a magic circle. Sc 6 times in loop, join with 1st sc to form circle. Pull thread to close the circle. Do not trim! Leave tail to weave in securely after sling bottom is made before trimming the end. This will prevent the magic circle from opening back up.

Round 1: ch 1, sc in first stitch from ch, sc twice in each remaining stitches, sl st to join (12 sc)

Round 2: ch 1, *sc in next 2 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch* repeat pattern to end, sl st to join (18 sc)

Round 3: ch 1, *sc in next 3 stitches, 2 sc in next stitch* repeat pattern to end, sl st to join (24 sc)

Sling Body:

NOTE: From here on, use a marker to show beginning of each round as the pattern works on a spiral.

Round 4: *ch 3, count 3 stitches from chain and sl st*, place stitch marker in this first chain space. Continue the pattern all around to end.

Round 5-18 Repeat round 4, moving marker up each round to show beginning of each round.

Round 19: sl st to first chain space, ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc in chain space, then stitch 3 dc in each chain space all around, sl st to join

Strap:

Row 1: ch 4 (counts as first tr), 1 tr in each of the next 3 stitches, turn
Rows 2-31: Repeat row 1, use less rows if making sling for a young child. Bag will stretch from weight of the water bottle.
To finish: sc the end of the strap to the sling, centering the strap to opposite side of bag opening. Weave in ends to secure and trim.

***If you would like a printable pdf of this pattern, you can get it here.

 

Crocheting Frenzy March 10, 2015

Filed under: Crafting — ourprairiehome @ 7:16 am
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Taking a short break from the simplicity posts to share what I have been doing lately.  It seems that I am thoroughly hit with the crochet bug.  I have always loved to crochet, but never had the time to really play with it as much as I would like to do.  In the evenings, I have been sitting near my 18-gallon sized tote filled with yarn as I crochet on one project or another.  Most recently, I have been working on making some baby blankets for gifts.  I am nearly done with the last of those, finally!  I am really a perfectionist when it comes to crocheted gifts.  I can’t believe the number of times that I will frog a project until I get it looking the way I want it to.

Over the past few days has been a great example of my frogging.  I am making 30 crocheted slings/bags for young girls to carry their water bottles in at a Jr Youth camp our church sponsors each spring and autumn.  Little Miss will be attending the Jr Camp, so I thought it would be fun to make each of the girls in the dorms a little something to use at camp and take home.  Thus, the idea of the water bottle sling came to fruition. I found what looked like a fun and easy pattern online.  After three tries, I finally gave up.  I used the hook size and gauge they suggested, but the bag was huge!  Another pattern yielded similar results.  I finally realized that they must crochet a LOT tighter than I do.  Having arthritis in my hands, I cannot crochet that tightly.  So, I finally got irritated with myself enough to just design my own pattern.  I absolutely LOVE the results!  These bags are far faster to make as well as being a very forgiving pattern.  I use a much smaller hook than the other patterns called for.  They used a size I (5.5mm) hook, while I am using a size F (3.75mm) hook.  I am nearly done with writing the pattern and will share it in a couple days, after I finish the strap on the bag and take a picture.

It has been a long time since I have written a pattern, so this has been fun for me to do.  It takes me back to my years as a craft designer, when I used to write and package patterns to sell.  Times have changed a lot since then.  After having written this one, I am thinking of writing patterns again and possibly selling them through Ravelry or Etsy.  When I wrote patterns and did work as a designer for manufacturers years ago, it allowed me to tap into my creativity in a way that I found to be very enjoyable.  I loved designing projects for others to enjoy making.  Often, I would design projects for kids as well as those for adults.  It feels good to get back in touch with that part of my life.